Preserve Info

Hiking
Equestrian

Overview

Teague Hill Open Space Preserve is located in the Santa Cruz Mountains just above the town of Woodside. Private Property and California Water Service Company Property make it difficult to visit the majority of Teague Hill. For those interested in visiting Teague Hill, the only accessible route is along the Bay Area Ridge Trail.

Gallery

Features

  • Containing a 1.0 mile section of the Bay Area Ridge Trail, visitors get a feel for the Douglas-fir, oak, bay, and madrone forest that comprise this portion of the Santa Cruz Mountains.

Directions

Limited parking is available along Kings Mountain Road in pullouts adjacent to the roadway.

Limited spaces are also available at Huddart and Wunderlich County Parks.

 

Trails

For those who are interested in visiting Teague Hill, the only accessible route is along the Bay Area Ridge Trail that begins approximately 0.25 miles east of Skyline Boulevard on Kings Mountain Road, where the trailhead is located on the south side of the road. 

The trail will take hikers or equestrians through a small portion of the northwest corner of Teague Hill on the way to San Mateo County’s Wunderlich Park. 

Trail Conditions

No trail conditions to report.

History

In Spanish times, pre-sawmill lumbering occurred at the fringe of forests around Portola Valley and Woodside to provide hand made shingles, hand hewn logs, and hand cut lumber for the construction of the Presidio, Mission of San Francisco, Mission Santa Clara, and pueblo of San Jose. 

Sawmilling in the Bear Gulch area, adjacent to Teague Hill, was started by San Mateo County’s first really large lumbering enterprise: the Baker & Burnham Gang Mill. This highly mechanized operation was set up in 1852. The exact site of the mill is not known, but it was perhaps near the upper end of Tripp Court, where small pieces of heavy equipment have been found. Large redwoods in Bear Gulch and Appletree Gulch (on the Preserve) surrounded the mill to the north. A financial crash and legal trouble ended this operation in 1855. The former creditors of Baker & Burnham became the owners and, headed by M. S. Gibbs, moved the mill to Squealer Gulch Creek, just to the other side of the current Preserve. The area continued to be logged under various owners, and was timbered out around 1865. Shingle mills could continue to operate, because they could work in canyons too deep or remote for lumbermen by using pack animals to carry the shingles out.

The first shingle mill in San Mateo County was introduced in 1856 by John G. Moore in Tripp Gulch, now a part of Teague Hill Open Space Preserve. The mill was later acquired by Dr.Tripp, a prominent Woodside merchant (and the town dentist), who for some time operated the small lumber yard. He made shingles with machinery; an innovative new process in the 1850s. Lumber went out via Old La Honda Road and past Woodside’s Whiskey Hill, heading for Redwood City. Woodside reached its peak as a lumbering center about 1859-60.

The County of San Mateo was formed by a separation from San Francisco County in 1856, and the lumber port of Redwood City was chosen as the seat of county government. Andrew Teague was elected San Mateo County District Attorney in 1869. Presumably Teague Hill was named after Andrew Teague. 

The information is taken primarily from “SAWMILLS IN THE REDWOODS, Logging on the San Francisco Peninsula, 1849-1967,” by Frank M. Stanger, published by the San Mateo County Historical Association.

Regulations

  • Hours: Open dawn to one-half hour after sunset.
  • Dogs: Dogs are NOT allowed in this Preserve. For information on dog-friendly preserves visit the Dog Access page.
  • Bicyclists: Bikes are NOT allowed in this Preserve. For information on preserves open to bikes visit the Bicycle Access page.
  • Equestrians: Horses are allowed on designated trails in this Preserve. Helmets are recommended for all equestrians. For more information visit the Equestrian Access page.
  • Groups: For safety reasons, permits are required for all groups of 20 or more people.
  • Fires: Fires are prohibited on preserves.
     
  • Smoking: Smoking is prohibited on preserves.
     
  • Weapons: Weapons of any kind are prohibited on preserves. 
     
  • Plants and Animals: Please leave plants and animals undisturbed. This not only preserves the natural environment, but is also a safety precaution. 
     
  • Water Areas: Swimming wading, or engaging in any water-contact activity in any water areas of the District is prohibited.

Download District Regulations and Ordinances

Overview

Teague Hill Open Space Preserve is located in the Santa Cruz Mountains just above the town of Woodside. Private Property and California Water Service Company Property make it difficult to visit the majority of Teague Hill. For those interested in visiting Teague Hill, the only accessible route is along the Bay Area Ridge Trail.

Photo Gallery

Features

  • Containing a 1.0 mile section of the Bay Area Ridge Trail, visitors get a feel for the Douglas-fir, oak, bay, and madrone forest that comprise this portion of the Santa Cruz Mountains.

Limited parking is available along Kings Mountain Road in pullouts adjacent to the roadway.

Limited spaces are also available at Huddart and Wunderlich County Parks.

 

Trails

For those who are interested in visiting Teague Hill, the only accessible route is along the Bay Area Ridge Trail that begins approximately 0.25 miles east of Skyline Boulevard on Kings Mountain Road, where the trailhead is located on the south side of the road. 

The trail will take hikers or equestrians through a small portion of the northwest corner of Teague Hill on the way to San Mateo County’s Wunderlich Park. 

Trail Conditions

No trail conditions to report.

In Spanish times, pre-sawmill lumbering occurred at the fringe of forests around Portola Valley and Woodside to provide hand made shingles, hand hewn logs, and hand cut lumber for the construction of the Presidio, Mission of San Francisco, Mission Santa Clara, and pueblo of San Jose. 

Sawmilling in the Bear Gulch area, adjacent to Teague Hill, was started by San Mateo County’s first really large lumbering enterprise: the Baker & Burnham Gang Mill. This highly mechanized operation was set up in 1852. The exact site of the mill is not known, but it was perhaps near the upper end of Tripp Court, where small pieces of heavy equipment have been found. Large redwoods in Bear Gulch and Appletree Gulch (on the Preserve) surrounded the mill to the north. A financial crash and legal trouble ended this operation in 1855. The former creditors of Baker & Burnham became the owners and, headed by M. S. Gibbs, moved the mill to Squealer Gulch Creek, just to the other side of the current Preserve. The area continued to be logged under various owners, and was timbered out around 1865. Shingle mills could continue to operate, because they could work in canyons too deep or remote for lumbermen by using pack animals to carry the shingles out.

The first shingle mill in San Mateo County was introduced in 1856 by John G. Moore in Tripp Gulch, now a part of Teague Hill Open Space Preserve. The mill was later acquired by Dr.Tripp, a prominent Woodside merchant (and the town dentist), who for some time operated the small lumber yard. He made shingles with machinery; an innovative new process in the 1850s. Lumber went out via Old La Honda Road and past Woodside’s Whiskey Hill, heading for Redwood City. Woodside reached its peak as a lumbering center about 1859-60.

The County of San Mateo was formed by a separation from San Francisco County in 1856, and the lumber port of Redwood City was chosen as the seat of county government. Andrew Teague was elected San Mateo County District Attorney in 1869. Presumably Teague Hill was named after Andrew Teague. 

The information is taken primarily from “SAWMILLS IN THE REDWOODS, Logging on the San Francisco Peninsula, 1849-1967,” by Frank M. Stanger, published by the San Mateo County Historical Association.

  • Hours: Open dawn to one-half hour after sunset.
  • Dogs: Dogs are NOT allowed in this Preserve. For information on dog-friendly preserves visit the Dog Access page.
  • Bicyclists: Bikes are NOT allowed in this Preserve. For information on preserves open to bikes visit the Bicycle Access page.
  • Equestrians: Horses are allowed on designated trails in this Preserve. Helmets are recommended for all equestrians. For more information visit the Equestrian Access page.
  • Groups: For safety reasons, permits are required for all groups of 20 or more people.
  • Fires: Fires are prohibited on preserves.
     
  • Smoking: Smoking is prohibited on preserves.
     
  • Weapons: Weapons of any kind are prohibited on preserves. 
     
  • Plants and Animals: Please leave plants and animals undisturbed. This not only preserves the natural environment, but is also a safety precaution. 
     
  • Water Areas: Swimming wading, or engaging in any water-contact activity in any water areas of the District is prohibited.

Download District Regulations and Ordinances

Download Preserve Map

Preserve Info

Hiking
Equestrian

Hours

Open dawn to one-half hour after sunset.

Preserve Activities

There are no events scheduled at this preserve currently.