Fog in Saratoga Gap

Saratoga Gap Preserve

Overview

Saratoga Gap Open Space Preserve is a 1,600-acre outdoor adventure located at the junction of Highway 35 and Highway 9 in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The Sempervirens Fund provided critical support for acquisition of portions of this preserve.

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Hiking: All Trails
Hiking: All Trails
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Bicycling: All Trails
Bicycling: All Trails
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Equestrian: All Trails
Equestrian: All Trails
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Dogs on Leash: Not Permitted
Dogs on Leash: Not Permitted
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No Easy Access
No Easy Access
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Camping: No Camping
Camping: No Camping
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Restrooms: Not Available
Restrooms: Not Available

Preserve Highlights & Features

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Moss or lichen covered tree at Saratoga Gap

Lichen and Moss

Attractive moss-covered trees, lichen-covered boulders and sandstone rock outcrops add to the scenic value of this area.

Stories from the Preserves

Nature

Here are some of the plants and animals that other visitors have observed at this preserve and recorded in iNaturalist. Protected species may be excluded and some species may not yet have been observed. Help improve iNaturalist by adding your observations to the Midpen Biodiversity Index project

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Know Before You Go

Preserve regulations help provide a safe, enjoyable visit while protecting sensitive areas and wildlife. 

Share the Trail 

  • Use designated trails to avoid damage to natural resources and prevent injury. 

  • Avoid blocking the trail. Step aside to allow others to pass .  

  • Whether you’re walking or biking, always yield to equestrians. 

  • Leave no trace. Pack out what you pack in. Most preserves do not have trash cans. Littering is prohibited. 

  • Abuses of trail etiquette should be brought to the attention of a ranger or call the Midpen main office at 650-691-1200. 

Activities & Events

There are currently no events scheduled.

History

The steep hillsides hold oak and mixed-evergreen forests that once yielded bark for tannin as well as wood for charcoal, both important commodities for early settlers. The District acquired the first parcel of the Preserve in 1974 from Paul and Nessie Cheseborough, supporters of open space, who made a gift of about 165 acres to the District. Sempervirens Fund, provided critical supporter for acquisition of parts of this Preserve.